Trewince Holiday Lodges, Portscatho, Truro, Cornwall TR2 5ET
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Category: About Trewince

Sunday School Treats

I found this book one day in the Truro library. It made fascinating reading. Sam Marsden was a very popular rector of Gerrans  around 1975/6. Here are some quotations from “Accounts of the memories and reminiscences of a number of people of the parish of Gerrans, collected by Sam Marsden, rector of Gerrans 1975 or 6.”

” For Sunday School outings the Congregationalists went to Pendower, so did the Wesleyans. The Bryanites went to Towan.”

“For our Sunday School treat we went to Pendower, or Towan or Trewince; we were allowed to have tea there and walk through the gardens. They had a carriage and pair and servants in livery (just a dark frock coat). We had splits and Saffron buns, and each took our own mug. We had games on the beach!!”

From the Archives………

Taken from a 2004 newsletter:

The Pool was finally declared open in February this year to everyone’s relief. We have received so many compliments on its quality that we feel that all the waiting was worthwhile. It has not been without its teething troubles, some of which continue: the UV technology which is used in the purification process is state-of-the-art and still being pe…rfected, and for everyone’s safety we err on the side of caution, especially with the spa pool, but everyone agrees that the low chlorine/no red eyes result is far superior to the chemical solution.

It has been a steep learning curve for our staff, for, contrary to our plans for a totally unattended pool, we found it necessary for health and safety reasons to have trained first aiders and pool rescue staff within call for emergencies. We have had a full health and safety analysis of the whole business, which has put everything on a secure footing. We have also struggled with our photo-entry computer software system which proved to be not quite so state-of-the art as we had hoped, but we have had lots of fun asking everyone to stand in front of the camera and some amusement when cards entered into the machine as Mrs A came out with an entirely new identity as Mr B!

On a more practical matter…

You may have admired the curtains in the manor house lounge without realising there was a little story attached. I’m going back a few years now, and the curtains are no longer there as the house has been sold and is being renovated – but it’s a good story so I’ll tell it.

We had decided to refurbish the room which had been used as a public TV room and was rather shabby.

We had chosen a carpet but hadn’t yet purchased it and we went along to a holiday/catering Trade show and casually looked at an interior designer’s stand where we recognised a sample of our carpet on a concept board with fabric samples and colours.

After a brief chat with the designer we established that this was a scheme he had undertaken elsewhere, had over-ordered on the material and had a surplus getting damp in his garage at home! After a bit more chat we agreed that if we bought the carpet through him (and his price was very competitive) he would GIVE us the material. Well – I liked that idea. The only problem was that the material was already cut into lengths and the lengths were too short for our windows.

Not easily put off, I made a join in each curtain, placed at the top where it would be hidden behind swags and tails. All I had to do was dry it out, and buy fringing, lining and lead weights. The very nice man even sketched out a quick design for us on the ‘back of an envelope’! I do like a bargain – don’t you? What a generous supplier he was, and what an amazing provision it was for us.

Location, location, location!

Long ago, all the fields around Trewince had descriptive names, and these can still been seen in the Tithe map of 1841 which can be viewed in the County Records office. The names are even older than this, though. In the Henderson Calendars we read:

“25/5/1648 Sir Peter Courteney leases to Ferdinando Hobbs of Gerrans gent for £60 and a surrender all Trewince and 4 closes called the Well Ground 20 acres, the Pease Meadow 1 1/4 acres, the Westerne grounds 12 lying on the west side of the Highway from Gerrans to St Anthony and being part of Trewynce and lands called the Downes 80 acres and a piece of waste ground called Polkerah (?) – lives said Ferdinando, Elizabeth his wife and Nicholas (son) — to the manor of Trethyn (illegible)”.

One field  below Trewince is called Pardon Bank, and it is where Henry VIII allegedly pardoned all political offenders in the area. In his “Accounts of the memories and reminiscences of a number of people of the parish of Gerrans”, Sam Marsden, rector of Gerrans 1975 or 6, wrote:

” The field on the left hand side of the road down to Trewince was where Henry viii held court, at which he pardoned all political offenders in the area. It is known as the Pardon Bank.”

Laurence O’Toole in his book  “Roseland between river and sea” wrote that Henry VIII was credited with staying at the Royal Standard in Gerrans during the time he was building St Mawes Castle but there is actually no evidence that he ever came to Cornwall. A bit like those other legends about Joseph of Arimathea…..

Royal Cornwall Gazette, 29th October 1929

Extract from the Royal Cornwall Gazette, 29th October 1929 “Growers’ Outstanding Success at Birmingham” Cornish growers have once again been successful at the Imperial Fruit Show at Birmingham. For top fruit growing Cornwall is one of the best, if not the most, severely handicapped of the counties in Great Britain, although fully compensated by the favourable climate for producing top fruit and… other out-of-season crops. The Cornish growers were in competition with growers from all parts of England and Wales, including such fruit areas as Kent and Norfolk. In the light of this fact, the success of Maj. E. N. Willyams, Carnanton, St. Columb, and Maj. A. L. Thomas, Trewince, Portscatho, in taking the second and third prizes respectively in the class for box dessert apples is most creditable….. The whole of the Cornish exhibits were packed as a result of instruction given by the Cornwall Education Committee Horticulture Department.

Awfulness in the Undergrowth

When we bought Trewince in 1985 there were 16 chalets on the site and our first job was to update them. No verandahs or balconies in those days – but sitting outside was still a pleasure on a sunny day.

I think the scene outside the chalet shows a painting class with Jim, our ‘artist in residence’. He painted the enormous pictures of galleons in the Fal which hung on the staircase in the manor house.

One visitor in 1990 left us some hand crafted wooden flowers and a poem ‘wot he wrote’. I think things are a bit better these days!

Awfulness in the undergrowth

I don’t get nettled very much
But here I often do
My doorstep’s stingers, weeds and such
Where is your gardening crew?

Oh yes, I know he’s cut the grass
But not taken it away,
Each time into my ‘hut’ I pass
I fill the place with hay.

Up market soon, log cabins eh!
They won’t cost half a crown,
For new splendour I’ve had to pay
While the old hut’s falling down.

Leave the cabin as you would wish to find
What can I do you fools
I don’t quite know what’s on your mind
I haven’t brought ‘me’ tools.

The floors aslant. The doors don’t fit
It is moving by the hour.
The toilet has no lid to it
You pull and get a shower.

Oh dash, I think I’ve said too much
For extras I must pay
A shower and orthopaedic bed
A health farm, you will say.

The doorstep moves, I think you’ll find
You’re trying to break my neck.
I came on holiday to unwind
And return a physical wreck.

Take all this all with a pinch of salt
I’m really having fun
To be too critical is a fault
Forget, scenery, walks and sun.

Both self and dog had a very good time
We lazed and walked for hours.
Really everything just suited us fine
And I’ve left a “vawse of flowers.

J. Notoften Back

Trewince Avenue Elms

Trewince Avenue before Dutch Elm disease destroyed the trees. This road is the one leading from the village up to our gates. The photo comes from Arthur Mee (Children’s Encyclopædia, I believe, but unable to verify). Date, anyone?

Below is another photo of Trewince Avenue. When we first arrived at Trewince in January 1985 one of the first things I experienced was skidding on the ice and crashing the car into one of the elm tree trunks buried in the hedgerow. It had been our son’s first day at the Roseland School and we had been misinformed about the time of the school bus, making it necessary to drive him to Tregony. At the time my husband was still working in London and was using our Morris Minor that week, so I had to explain to him that I had dented the company Volvo! In fact, I only just managed to drive it to my new home.

The Elm trees have been replaced by Sycamores planted at the sides of the road (actually on the edges of Trewince Farm fields.) Time will tell whether the appearance of the Avenue will be restored but it’s hard to imagine that it will ever look like this again.

Spring is on its way

Spring Cleaning is underway and last week Ken came to fit new carpets & flooring in some of the Lodges.

But who wants to be working indoors on these balmy days when it should be winter but feels like Spring ….  and when you have a view like this through the window of your Lodge.

Even in the depths of winter we have Timeshare visitors here at Trewince, sometimes travelling from abroad. Over a month ago a parcel arrived, all the way from Italy. It was large and heavy and we puzzled over its contents. We wanted to know what was inside but it was not addressed to us. So we sat on it. Not literally, but we found it a place in our stationery cupboard under the stairs and visited it from time to time. We weren’t sure quite why it had appeared – don’t you just love a mystery?

Well – last week it was collected by a grateful timeshare visitor who had sent it on ahead. And he’s not staying with us until later in the year but was on his way to another Cornish resort. That’s the joy of Timeshare – just when our thoughts are turning to Carribean beaches and romantic cruises, there are people from sunnier climes thinking only of Cornwall. It’s certainly worth it on days like this when it’s balmy and beautiful and the sea glistens temptingly on the horizon. And those chocolates from Italy sit snugly on the desk.

If you go down in the Woods today…

“If you go down in the woods today you’re sure of a big surprise…” tra la

“If you go down in the woods today you’d better keep still and quiet…” tra la

As you can see from Steve Bradbury’s lovely illustration (used on our brochure some years ago), you can see badgers in the woods, hear buzzards mewing overhead, spot a heron nesting in high treetops beside the river and even spot a kingfisher if you are really lucky. I’ve never managed to see one of those.

Guests would enjoy seeing the badgers at dusk, and some people would leave bowls of bread and milk outside for them. One lady told me that she had been fortunate enough to snap a photo of the badger through her window (they would come by night, and sometimes invaded the bins!). Unfortunately, when the photo was developed it turned out to be our cat starring centre-stage. A lovely ginger one we used to have.

But – I have a new development to record. In March last year when I was walking down the track through the woods, to my great surprise I saw about three small, agile deer leaping across the path in the distance. I could hardly believe my eyes and later began to wonder whether I had imagined it….

My ambition now is to get a photograph. Apparently people have seen more than three but they are quite shy.

Welcome to Trewince Holiday Lodges!

We are situated in the centre of 26-acres in a prime position overlooking the English Channel at the southern tip of the Roseland Peninsula. Our estate is fully landscaped and almost surrounded by water. Gerrans Bay is to the front of the Georgian manor with the Percuil River to the west. Guests can walk through our woodland which leads to our own private quay on Froe Creek where boats have access down the Carrick Roads to the sea. Carrick Roads is an expansive waterway which forms a large natural harbour between Falmouth and the Roseland. The lower part of our estate looks across to St. Mawes. We welcome self-catering and timeshare guests.

Our 3 bedroomed luxury timber lodges are welcoming self-catering holiday homes which accommodate up to 6 people and have unique interior touches. All are fully furnished and generously equipped with bed linen, duvets, pillows, cooker, fridge, freezer, microwave, washer/drier, dishwasher, coffee maker, toaster and iron. They are also equipped with Freesat digital television or Sky.

Trewince has a 13m indoor pool with sauna and spa bath as well as children’s splash pool. We use the latest UV water treatment instead of the chemical approach.

All our staff live locally and we pride ourselves on local knowledge. Whether it be something you would like to see, taste or experience we will help you find it. You, the guest, are what we focus on. Low-occupancy discounts are available at certain times of the year and we advertise last minute discounts on our website. Please contact us for details.

The Roseland has been designated an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty andHeritageCoast. The area has great places to eat, together with several places to hire motor boats, sailing dinghies, kayaks and wind surfers. There are many spectacular walks to be experienced: just ask our staff and they will be pleased to make recommendations.

Trewince has lodges for sale and is also affiliated to RCI Timeshare for holiday exchanges or you can of course spend all your time here on the Roseland.

For old-world charm, relaxed lifestyle, quiet beaches, coastal walks, sailing from our own quay, Trewince is the place to stay.

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