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Archive for May 2012

Development of the Manor House

Posted on: 24th May 2012
Queen Anne Window

Queen Anne Window

Almost every day we are asked about what is happening with the restoration of the house, and we, like you, can’t wait to see what is to come. I am therefore very pleased that this information has now been put at our disposal. Here it is:

A Cornish Architect and a Listed Properties Historical Buildings expert (who worked on the Windsor Castle restoration after the fire) plus other relevant experts have been working on a five phased restoration plan. They are now finalising the fifth and final phase of the restoration plan before submitting the fifth plan to the Planning Authorities and relevant Historical and Listed Buildings Bodies who during the phased restoration process have all been kept fully informed.

All the five phased restoration plans will provide for the certainty, stability and sustainability of retaining both the 1750 period and the Victorian period buildings for the future and removing the past additions/changes that are not in keeping with the relevant periods.

Phase 1 has been the restoration (not replacement) of the windows (keeping all the existing windows including the rare landing window at the rear) and in order to secure the property.

Phase 2 has been the containment and protection of a rare bat colony in the Victorian loft and insertion of a bat entrance in the Victorian apex. This has all had to be managed through relevant experts after careful study, surveys and lengthy approval procedures.

Phase 3 is the works for improved and effective drainage of the internal roof well to prevent internal flooding and consequent damage to ornate plasterwork that has occurred over a lengthy time. The plans have recently been approved subject to relevant conditions. This work will be carried out shortly. The current listed drainage system will remain intact.

Phase 4 will be the carrying out of the roof and parapet renovation now that these plans have also been approved, subject to relevant conditions, after the bat breeding season ends in September this year, hence the hold up on the roof and retention of scaffolding.

Phase 5 is the both the internal and external maintenance, repair and renovation that is subject to the approval of the proposals currently being finalised. The length of time of this process is due to the necessary historical research and the architectural and many other surveys that have had to be carried out in order to manage the whole site responsibly.

With regard to the Cottage, this has recently had plans (prepared by the Architect and Listed Buildings expert) approved, subject to relevant conditions, for an internal and external renovation and the enlargement of the kitchen plus a small porch extension, all in keeping with its historical period. The Cottage is integral to the proposals for the restoration of the Manor as part of the whole site including the drive, the grounds and outside buildings.

Ghosts, buried treasure and a discovery of our own

Posted on: 7th May 2012

More anecdotes from Sam Marsden’s little book, and some anecdotes of our own:

“There is a ghost that comes out into the little meadow (corner meadow) at Trewince. She took all the silver from the house in the time of the Civil War – she took it out and buried it. And now she’s supposed to come back and look at it.”

“The ghost at Trewince was supposed to be by the Oak tree hanging over the hill, going down Trewince Road. It was supposed to be seen there and going down Pelyn.”

” When I was a parlour maid at Trewince, I saw someone pass the door. I thought it was the children playing pranks on me again. So I called out but there was no answer. I went out of the door and looked and there was no-one there. The coachman came in and said, ‘That was the grey lady you saw.'”

Discovering the tunnel

Discovering the tunnel

We used to wonder whether there was a real hoard of silver buried somewhere at Trewince. There had been rumours of a tunnel hidden away somewhere. One day, over 10 years ago, we were grubbing up some bushes in the front lawn with a JCB when suddenly a big hole opened up. The digger driver, a friend of ours who was helping us, leaped out of the cab and jumped down into the hole.

It turned out to be part of a tunnel which had partially collapsed. It led down towards the beach in one direction and back towards the house in the other, travelling under the front driveway. The walls of the tunnel were lined with a dry stone wall, and it was high enough to walk along in a slightly stooped position.

There was a clay pipe running along the floor and when we made enquiries, a local historian suggested that it might have been used for drainage from the house but ‘probably had more sinister usage’ ie. smuggling. It was just too elaborate for drainage.

We looked in the well around the cellar of the house and saw a bricked-up entrance in the wall. We knocked out the bricks and found the entrance to the tunnel.

Archaeologists in Truro were disinterested, but we found the dicovery very exciting. After a while, though, we had no alternative but to cover the hole in the lawn with a big board and leave the secret there for another generation to discover. And the buried treasure….??