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Posts Tagged ‘History’

Recollections from a past visitor

Posted on: 19th March 2013

Gordon Fox shared a few memories with us after looking at the pictures of the old pontoon. “The remains of it were still there in the sixties and there was a wooden boat shed containing old canoes and rotting life jacket detritus with some clinker built boats upside down mostly rotten, one of which wasn’t too bad, ok for calmish seas and we used to row to St Mawes in it until the following year when my Dad bought a British Seagull outboard engine to use on it until after another year or two it became unseaworthy and started to fall apart. He then hired a safer good Dory sea boat to put the outboard on and we stuck with that type of boat until going for a lot faster inflatable with higher powered outboard.”The boat shed was still there in 1985 when we arrived at Trewince but it was washed into the water by a landslide onto the Quay one winter. It had seen better days by then. It made a good bonfire!

Gordon went on to say: “Our family and friends holidayed at Trewince for many happy years because we loved the people and the area and we were great friends with managers Jim and Jean Wilde and their daughter Sally. First time was as a child was in a chalet. Coach Cottage, Quay cottage stays started when my father bought a Hutchinson Nautisport inflatable with a Volvo Penta outboard that zipped it along at about 30 knots. It did for fishing, shopping trips to Falmouth and St Mawes, beach and pub/restaurant runs. So the car stayed virtually immobile for two weeks which suited my Dad as he drove for his living as a commercial truck salesman, and because there’s no breathalyzers on the water. As an adult I used to meet up with my family and groups of friends there when I was on leave serving in the RAF in Germany, then later at Brize Norton. The last time I stayed at Trewince was to camp up for a few days after backpacking the Cornish Coastal Path from St Ives in the late 80s or early 90s meeting up with my sister, brother in law and young nephew. There was drama one night as a caravan went up in flames in the woods and the PT firefighters had been in the pub first, but they sorted it and nobody was injured. Superb place.”

Gordon might be interested in seeing this old list of Charter rates from 1962:

Charter Rates 1962

Charter Rates 1962

From the Archives

Posted on: 5th March 2013
aspirational 1960's Brochure

Aspirational

This brochure probably dates back to the 1970’s and features the ‘Modern comfortable Bluebird Senator Caravans’ and aspirational sketches of other accommodation: hot water was provided to BOTH floors of the House, and kitchenettes were an important feature in the flatlets!

1960's Brochure caravans

Retro

The aforementioned caravans:- toilet facilities were in the corner of the walled garden, and showers were in the cellar of the house – with slot meters OUTSIDE the shower. A quick dash for the meter was necessary if the money ran out mid-shower. They were still in use in 1985, when visitors could be seen running, dripping, to the shop with soapy hair to complain that the shower had packed up. Low water pressure was quite an issue.

1960's Brochure Restaurant

Recreational

The restaurant was in the Stables where the swimming pool is now positioned. It later became the games room with a laundry beyond the curtain. Table tennis, anyone?

1960's Menu

1960’s Menu

………….. or maybe a dish from the Menu?

 

 

The times they are a-changing

Posted on: 25th September 2012
Western Morning News Friday 26 February 1943
REQD., Thoroly Trustworthy Domstcd. Person to look after an aged lady and charge of 2 rooms; salary £52 p.a. and all found. — Apply Miss Duff Trewince Portscatho S Cornwall.

Western Morning News Saturday 06 January 1945
Young girl reqd. as NURSEMD., full- or part-time; also HOUSEMD. Reqd.; suit 2 friends. — Maudslay, Trewince, Portscatho

The BRITISH NEWSPAPER ARCHIVE

Will and probate of Stephen Johns of Trewince

Posted on: 17th April 2012
It’s amazing what you can find when you dig in the records at the Royal Cornwall Museum (Courtney Library)
HO/2/82 12/7/1778 Will and probate of Stephen Johns of Trewince. Executor was Richard Johns. “In the name of God Amen. I Stephen Johns of Trewince within the parish of Gerrans in the County of Cornwall Esquire being at this time in a tolerable good state of bodily health and of a sound and disposing mind memory and understanding (Praise be to God for the same), but considering the great uncertainty of this life and how necessary it is, that a settled disposition should be made of all my temporal affairs Do make and ordain this my last will and testament in manner and form following (that is to say) First – I resign my Soul into the hands of God in his due Time hoping in and through the merits of our Saviour Jesus Christ for a full and perfect remission of all my sins and transgressions whatsoever, and my body to the earth to be decently interred at the discretion of my executors hereinafter named and as to my real and personal estate I give and dispose thereof as followeth: first debts legacies and funeral charges be paid and satisfied to wife Ann Johns 100 guineas to be paid six months after death and household furniture as she shall chuse and think necessary for her use. Also ratifies and confirms joint use or settlement made unto or in trust for her on and previous to my intermarriage and my will and meaning is that the same and the above legacies or bequests may be accepted and taken in full Barlieu and satisfaction of and for all Dower and Thirds which she might otherwise claim or be instituted unto out of any of my lands goods or chattels. Youngest son Stephen James Johns £1000 to be paid 6 months after attaining 21. Meantime to be educated in a proper manner out of the estate at discretion of executors and trustees; when attains a proper age to be put out and placed out as a clerk or an apprentice to some profession trade or business. Either clerk to attorney or merchant of good character and reputation in his profession or to a surgeon and apothecary or such other trade business or profession as shall be thought most proper and my said son should approve of. Also such sums of money as should be necessary in these professions etc. (Not to be taken out of £1000). Daughters Mary Ann and Elizabeth £800 1 year after 21 or marriage with consent of their mother and education wife Ann kinsman Richard Thomas of Tretheake cousin John Davis of Penryn and survivors and heirs messuages lands tenements hereditaments goods chattels and personal estate in trust for eldest son Richard Johns and heirs during his minority, after which he will be the sole executor. They are to be trustees and also Executors of the will. Also guardianship to tuition of all my children. If RJ died in minority unmarried or without issue of his body lawfully begotten then inheritance would go to trustees and put in trust for Stephen James Johns (younger son). Written 1778 – died 1793? Probate; letter of administration dated 1793 (16th December.)ie proved 1793 Stephen John (younger) married Ann James from Saltash daughter of merchant. Richard Johns esq. of Trewince or his heirs or assigns are entitled to a moity of all the tithable lands of the parish, except Rosteague, Trewarthas, Tregair, Tregairwoon.

Musical Adventures in Cornwall

Posted on: 26th March 2012
Musical Adventures in Cornwall

Musical Adventures in Cornwall

The British Newspaper Archives make fascinating reading and in the Western Morning News and Daily Gazette of Monday March 14th 1938 I came across a reference to an appearance of the Falmouth Opera Singers, giving two performances at London’s Notting Hill Gate of Mozart’s opera “Idomineo”, with “The chief honours” going to “the orchestra, which, under the baton of Miss Maisie Radford, played crisply throughout”! The story of the Radford sisters, and indeed the Falmouth Opera Singers, is told in their 1965 book, “Musical Adventures in Cornwall”, and the amazing achievements emerging from their St Anthony-in-Roseland cottage and studio are a joy just waiting to be discovered.
They shared their music in W.I’s and village halls and formed choirs and orchestras all over Cornwall, founding  the Falmouth Opera Singers in 1923. Their productions of classical opera included the first performance of Mozart’s Idomeneo in England, and performances of Gluck’s operas, which were acclaimed by musicians throughout the country.  The best means of transport from St Anthony at the time was by water, and in their own words, “All had to be transplanted by farm cart, by row boat, by steamer, by truck from the steamer, whenever we set out.” To get to their newly founded St Mawes Choral Society, their first permanent choir, they “had only to run down two fields and row across.” The book tells of the dismay of their visiting singer at having to “wade over thick mud in evening dress, through pitch darkness, to launch the rowing boat which was then their only transport back to their Roseland home”.
Their tradition has been continued by their niece, Jennet Campbell, founder of our local band, ‘St Anthony’s Noyse’, and you can read more on the website of the Radford Trust, and of course in their fabulous book, published by David and Charles.

On a more practical matter…

Posted on: 24th February 2012

You may have admired the curtains in the manor house lounge without realising there was a little story attached. I’m going back a few years now, and the curtains are no longer there as the house has been sold and is being renovated – but it’s a good story so I’ll tell it.

We had decided to refurbish the room which had been used as a public TV room and was rather shabby.

We had chosen a carpet but hadn’t yet purchased it and we went along to a holiday/catering Trade show and casually looked at an interior designer’s stand where we recognised a sample of our carpet on a concept board with fabric samples and colours.

After a brief chat with the designer we established that this was a scheme he had undertaken elsewhere, had over-ordered on the material and had a surplus getting damp in his garage at home! After a bit more chat we agreed that if we bought the carpet through him (and his price was very competitive) he would GIVE us the material. Well – I liked that idea. The only problem was that the material was already cut into lengths and the lengths were too short for our windows.

Not easily put off, I made a join in each curtain, placed at the top where it would be hidden behind swags and tails. All I had to do was dry it out, and buy fringing, lining and lead weights. The very nice man even sketched out a quick design for us on the ‘back of an envelope’! I do like a bargain – don’t you? What a generous supplier he was, and what an amazing provision it was for us.

the finished job

the finished job

Enter Stephen Johns

Posted on: 23rd February 2012

Lake’s “Parochial history of Cornwall” 1868 records that the present manor house at Trewince was erected in 1750 by the grandson or great grandson of a man named Richard Johns. Quoting from the ‘History of Cornwall vol 2 Gilbert 1838’ (based on manuscript histories of Hals and Tonkin), the editor wrote that: “An extremely good house was built here about the year 1750 by the grandson or greatgrandson of the gentleman who made the purchase of Trelegar from Mr Trevanian.”

old Trewince

old Trewince

Trewince was described as “A very pleasant house of 5 bays 2 storeyed with quoins and a door with an alternatingly rusticated surround (ie Gibbs) 1750. ”

There is another reference to Mr Johns here; I don’t think that a ‘squire of Gerrans’, resident at Trewince, could possibly expect such entitlements in the 21st century:

“The Bishop of Exeter  endowed Gerrans church the one half as a rectory, the other as a vicarage. This division was effected in a very unusual manner, although in one not quite without example. Instead of apportioning the tithe of corn to the rector, and all other portions, as small tithes, to the vicar, the whole has here been divided into equal shares; so that Mr Johns of Trewince the lay impropriator is entitled to 1/20th of everything tithable and the incumbent to another twentieth.” This would have been Stephen Johns for we read of a lease of 1753  – ‘Stephen John, on the lives of Stephen 25 Elenor 18 son and daughter of Stephen’. This expression ‘on the lives’ refers to a form of lease which was used in the 17th & 18th centuries, which was based on the lives of three specified people, so the lease would last for the lifetimes of the father Stephen, who could have been about 45, his son Stephen, aged 25 and his daughter Elenor aged 18: for the natural life of the survivor or longest liver of them. The theory was that the property would remain in the family for a substantial amount of time, since every time one of the ‘lives’ died, the lease would be surrendered and raised again on another three lives.

Stephen died soon after this: in his will of 04/11/1761 the ‘remainder of lands’ were left to his son Stephen Johns. I saw a document relating to the administration of his will in 1766, and it was in such a fragile state that I was amazed that viewing was allowed! The will referred to daughters Abigail, Ann and Eleanor and son Stephen; witnesses were Henry Nicholls, Martin Davis, and John Pascoe. He left to his wife ‘meadows in Trewithian’; to daughter Abigail £500 as a marriage settlement to be paid within a year of his death; in the meantime interest on this of £4 per cent per annum; to daughter Ann and daughter Eleanor the same; the remainder of lands and tenements were left to his son Stephen.

Johns Memorial in Gerrans churchyard

Johns Memorial in Gerrans churchyard

It was interesting to read about leases at http://bit.ly/wgZJlG . Apparently, leases sometimes had a wavy edge where two halves of an agreement had been cut apart and could be matched back together at a later date in order  to check that both halves of the agreement were the original documents.

There are accounts books relating to this period, referring to large parcels of land
1760 S Johns – Trewince (80 acres)
Polhaughan
Lanhoose
267 acres
Treluggan and so on….
They show amounts of wheat and  barley and the sale of lump sugar

Location, location, location!

Posted on: 10th February 2012
Trewince Aerial View

Trewince Aerial View

Long ago, all the fields around Trewince had descriptive names, and these can still been seen in the Tithe map of 1841 which can be viewed in the County Records office. The names are even older than this, though. In the Henderson Calendars we read:

“25/5/1648 Sir Peter Courteney leases to Ferdinando Hobbs of Gerrans gent for £60 and a surrender all Trewince and 4 closes called the Well Ground 20 acres, the Pease Meadow 1 1/4 acres, the Westerne grounds 12 lying on the west side of the Highway from Gerrans to St Anthony and being part of Trewynce and lands called the Downes 80 acres and a piece of waste ground called Polkerah (?) – lives said Ferdinando, Elizabeth his wife and Nicholas (son) — to the manor of Trethyn (illegible)”.

One field  below Trewince is called Pardon Bank, and it is where Henry VIII allegedly pardoned all political offenders in the area. In his “Accounts of the memories and reminiscences of a number of people of the parish of Gerrans”, Sam Marsden, rector of Gerrans 1975 or 6, wrote:

” The field on the left hand side of the road down to Trewince was where Henry viii held court, at which he pardoned all political offenders in the area. It is known as the Pardon Bank.”

Laurence O’Toole in his book  “Roseland between river and sea” wrote that Henry VIII was credited with staying at the Royal Standard in Gerrans during the time he was building St Mawes Castle but there is actually no evidence that he ever came to Cornwall. A bit like those other legends about Joseph of Arimathea…..

Royal Cornwall Gazette, 29th October 1929

Posted on: 8th February 2012
apple
Extract from the Royal Cornwall Gazette, 29th October 1929 “Growers’ Outstanding Success at Birmingham”     Cornish growers have once again been successful at the Imperial Fruit Show at Birmingham. For top fruit growing Cornwall is one of the best, if not the most, severely handicapped of the counties in Great Britain, although fully compensated by the favourable climate for producing top fruit and… other out-of-season crops.     The Cornish growers were in competition with growers from all parts of England and Wales, including such fruit areas as Kent and Norfolk. In the light of this fact, the success of Maj. E. N. Willyams, Carnanton, St. Columb, and Maj. A. L. Thomas, Trewince, Portscatho, in taking the second and third prizes respectively in the class for box dessert apples is most creditable…..     The whole of the Cornish exhibits were packed as a result of instruction given by the Cornwall Education Committee Horticulture Department.

Who did Trewince belong to?

Posted on: 30th January 2012

It is interesting to try and trace the ownership of Trewince from the earliest days.

caption for Hobbs memorial Gerrans church

According to the Rentals and Surveys of Manors from manuscripts in the custody of the Ecclesiastical Commissioners, from the 1538 Survey the Manor of Tregear (which included St Mawes/  Portscatho/ Gerrans/ Lamoran/ Ruan/ Feock out to the Veryan boundary) had probably been church property for at least 1000 years. There was no specific mention of Trewince however. Tregear belonged to Bishop of Exeter at the time of Domesday 1085  but was probably administered by the ecclesiastical conmmissioners. It may have been held by religious bodies in Celtic times and gradually absorbed by the Diocesan Bishoprics of Bodmin and St Germans which were finally consolidated into one see with Devonshire c.1030.

1140: The parish of St Anthony was granted by the Bishop to the Priory of Plympton.

1538: A synopsis of the members of the Manor of Tregear from the rental of 1538 mentions Lands held by the Manor by Knights Service – including Trewyns.

In the times of the Star Chamber (Edward VI, 1537-53) we read that “Stephen Craier seized the manors of ….and a tenement called Trewince in Gerrans.

1563: Alice Reskymer made a will and left “to the heirs of her body …. a mes called Trewins in Cherens [Gerrans]. Alice R when she died she was seized of the manors of Trewins”.  Peter Courtenay esq. is also mentioned.

1613: Edward Courtneye of Trewyne (Trewynce) leased his ‘mes. and rent’ to the Eland family.

1617  Edward Courtneye of Trethwiffe in Lazack Esq and Elizabeth his wife leases to Nicholas Hobbs of Gerrans all those lands called Trewynce on the w side and the highway leading to Gerrans church towne called the Downes (80 acres) Lives Thamseyn wife of Nicholas Hobbs, Ferdinando and Jane son & daughter of the said Nicholas ans Tam. A lease was granted to Nicholas Hobbs of Gerrans : all those lands called Trewynce and certain closes part of Trewynce on the west side and the highway leading to Gerrans church towne.

1641 The Protestant returns list Ferdinando Hobbs and Edw Hobbs. (Everyone in England had to sign the Protestation swearing allegiance to the true Reformed Protestant religion against all Popery. In Cornwall the returns comprised a list of all male parishioners 18 and over).

Hobbs Memorial Gerrans Church

Hobbs Memorial Gerrans Church

Up to 1675 we continue to find references to the Hobbs family in relation to Trewince., and there is a Hobbs monument in the church at Gerrans which displays the family arms, namely “Argent, 3 escutcheons sable, each charged with an eagle displayed” or, “impaling, Argent, 2 swords in saltire proper, hilts and pommels or, in chief, a bunch of grapes of the second, leaved and stalked as the sale; being the arms of the family of Thomas of Tregolls near Truro.”

Hobbs Coat of Arms

Hobbs Coat of Arms