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Archive for the ‘History’ Category

From the Archives

Posted on: 5th March 2013
aspirational 1960's Brochure

Aspirational

This brochure probably dates back to the 1970’s and features the ‘Modern comfortable Bluebird Senator Caravans’ and aspirational sketches of other accommodation: hot water was provided to BOTH floors of the House, and kitchenettes were an important feature in the flatlets!

1960's Brochure caravans

Retro

The aforementioned caravans:- toilet facilities were in the corner of the walled garden, and showers were in the cellar of the house – with slot meters OUTSIDE the shower. A quick dash for the meter was necessary if the money ran out mid-shower. They were still in use in 1985, when visitors could be seen running, dripping, to the shop with soapy hair to complain that the shower had packed up. Low water pressure was quite an issue.

1960's Brochure Restaurant

Recreational

The restaurant was in the Stables where the swimming pool is now positioned. It later became the games room with a laundry beyond the curtain. Table tennis, anyone?

1960's Menu

1960’s Menu

………….. or maybe a dish from the Menu?

 

 

…….but this could have been but yesterday

Posted on: 26th September 2012

Extract from a piece written by “Wanderer” in the Royal Cornwall Gazette of Thursday 23 June 1892

PORTSCATHO

This charming little watering place, in praise of which so much has been said and written at various times, is again donning its holiday attire.

Visitors are arriving from all parts of the kingdom. The jaded city man is glad to throw aside, with his tall hat and orthodox black coat, the cares of office and counting house.

The parson wearied with parochial worries and anxieties, rejoicing, let us hope, in an efficient “locum tenens” at home, throws care to the winds for a season and joins the genial rush to the sea, The ladies are arriving in force, and the children – bless their jolly little faces ! – go without saying.

For lovers of a thoroughly unconventional holiday, do and dress as you like, go and come as you please, I know of no place like Portscatho, while to the artist, botanist, or lover of aquatic pastimes it is paradise indeed.

The times they are a-changing

Posted on: 25th September 2012
Western Morning News Friday 26 February 1943
REQD., Thoroly Trustworthy Domstcd. Person to look after an aged lady and charge of 2 rooms; salary £52 p.a. and all found. — Apply Miss Duff Trewince Portscatho S Cornwall.

Western Morning News Saturday 06 January 1945
Young girl reqd. as NURSEMD., full- or part-time; also HOUSEMD. Reqd.; suit 2 friends. — Maudslay, Trewince, Portscatho

The BRITISH NEWSPAPER ARCHIVE

Battered eagles

Posted on: 31st July 2012

EntranceTwo battered eagles perch on the gate posts of Trewince – a link with the past to the Hobbs family who had eagles in their coat of arms and had connections here. The ancient manor overlooks both Froe Creek, leading to the Percuil river, and the sea, and stands on a wooded spur with woods of beech and pine leading to a small quay which belongs to the house. A field called Pardon Bank is just below Trewince, and it is here that Henry VIII is said to have pardoned all political offenders in the area.John Collett Thomas was a draper in London who retired to Trewince and he was the next to last squire in residence. The title of squire of Gerrans was generally held by the tenants of Trewince. Local people still remember the last of the squires and the time when people would touch their hats as the coach & horses rode through the village; there is a spot in the woods where the squire would sit and where the servants used to deliver his afternoon tea.

In the early 19th century the squire hunted regularly and Carew, in his “Survey of Cornwall”, describes the Cornish gentry gathering in each others’ houses, feasting and dancing, gambling and drinking. Last century Trewince was the place for the annual Sunday School treat. “They had a carriage and pair and servants in livery. We had splits and Saffron buns, and each took our own mug. We had games on the beach!!” (from “Accounts of the memories and reminiscences of a number of people of the parish of Gerrans”, collected by Sam Marsden, former rector of Gerrans).

The painting of the front gates with their eagles is by Stephen Bradbury from Mullion, Cornwall – known for his book cover illustrations.

Development of the Manor House

Posted on: 24th May 2012
Queen Anne Window

Queen Anne Window

Almost every day we are asked about what is happening with the restoration of the house, and we, like you, can’t wait to see what is to come. I am therefore very pleased that this information has now been put at our disposal. Here it is:

A Cornish Architect and a Listed Properties Historical Buildings expert (who worked on the Windsor Castle restoration after the fire) plus other relevant experts have been working on a five phased restoration plan. They are now finalising the fifth and final phase of the restoration plan before submitting the fifth plan to the Planning Authorities and relevant Historical and Listed Buildings Bodies who during the phased restoration process have all been kept fully informed.

All the five phased restoration plans will provide for the certainty, stability and sustainability of retaining both the 1750 period and the Victorian period buildings for the future and removing the past additions/changes that are not in keeping with the relevant periods.

Phase 1 has been the restoration (not replacement) of the windows (keeping all the existing windows including the rare landing window at the rear) and in order to secure the property.

Phase 2 has been the containment and protection of a rare bat colony in the Victorian loft and insertion of a bat entrance in the Victorian apex. This has all had to be managed through relevant experts after careful study, surveys and lengthy approval procedures.

Phase 3 is the works for improved and effective drainage of the internal roof well to prevent internal flooding and consequent damage to ornate plasterwork that has occurred over a lengthy time. The plans have recently been approved subject to relevant conditions. This work will be carried out shortly. The current listed drainage system will remain intact.

Phase 4 will be the carrying out of the roof and parapet renovation now that these plans have also been approved, subject to relevant conditions, after the bat breeding season ends in September this year, hence the hold up on the roof and retention of scaffolding.

Phase 5 is the both the internal and external maintenance, repair and renovation that is subject to the approval of the proposals currently being finalised. The length of time of this process is due to the necessary historical research and the architectural and many other surveys that have had to be carried out in order to manage the whole site responsibly.

With regard to the Cottage, this has recently had plans (prepared by the Architect and Listed Buildings expert) approved, subject to relevant conditions, for an internal and external renovation and the enlargement of the kitchen plus a small porch extension, all in keeping with its historical period. The Cottage is integral to the proposals for the restoration of the Manor as part of the whole site including the drive, the grounds and outside buildings.

Sunday School Treats

Posted on: 17th April 2012

I found this book one day in the Truro library. It made fascinating reading. Sam Marsden was a very popular rector of Gerrans  around 1975/6. Here are some quotations from “Accounts of the memories and reminiscences of a number of people of the parish of Gerrans, collected by Sam Marsden, rector of Gerrans 1975 or 6.”

” For Sunday School outings the Congregationalists went to Pendower, so did the Wesleyans. The Bryanites went to Towan.”

“For our Sunday School treat we went to Pendower, or Towan or Trewince; we were allowed to have tea there and walk through the gardens. They had a carriage and pair and servants in livery (just a dark frock coat). We had splits and Saffron buns, and each took our own mug. We had games on the beach!!”

Will and probate of Stephen Johns of Trewince

Posted on: 17th April 2012
It’s amazing what you can find when you dig in the records at the Royal Cornwall Museum (Courtney Library)
HO/2/82 12/7/1778 Will and probate of Stephen Johns of Trewince. Executor was Richard Johns. “In the name of God Amen. I Stephen Johns of Trewince within the parish of Gerrans in the County of Cornwall Esquire being at this time in a tolerable good state of bodily health and of a sound and disposing mind memory and understanding (Praise be to God for the same), but considering the great uncertainty of this life and how necessary it is, that a settled disposition should be made of all my temporal affairs Do make and ordain this my last will and testament in manner and form following (that is to say) First – I resign my Soul into the hands of God in his due Time hoping in and through the merits of our Saviour Jesus Christ for a full and perfect remission of all my sins and transgressions whatsoever, and my body to the earth to be decently interred at the discretion of my executors hereinafter named and as to my real and personal estate I give and dispose thereof as followeth: first debts legacies and funeral charges be paid and satisfied to wife Ann Johns 100 guineas to be paid six months after death and household furniture as she shall chuse and think necessary for her use. Also ratifies and confirms joint use or settlement made unto or in trust for her on and previous to my intermarriage and my will and meaning is that the same and the above legacies or bequests may be accepted and taken in full Barlieu and satisfaction of and for all Dower and Thirds which she might otherwise claim or be instituted unto out of any of my lands goods or chattels. Youngest son Stephen James Johns £1000 to be paid 6 months after attaining 21. Meantime to be educated in a proper manner out of the estate at discretion of executors and trustees; when attains a proper age to be put out and placed out as a clerk or an apprentice to some profession trade or business. Either clerk to attorney or merchant of good character and reputation in his profession or to a surgeon and apothecary or such other trade business or profession as shall be thought most proper and my said son should approve of. Also such sums of money as should be necessary in these professions etc. (Not to be taken out of £1000). Daughters Mary Ann and Elizabeth £800 1 year after 21 or marriage with consent of their mother and education wife Ann kinsman Richard Thomas of Tretheake cousin John Davis of Penryn and survivors and heirs messuages lands tenements hereditaments goods chattels and personal estate in trust for eldest son Richard Johns and heirs during his minority, after which he will be the sole executor. They are to be trustees and also Executors of the will. Also guardianship to tuition of all my children. If RJ died in minority unmarried or without issue of his body lawfully begotten then inheritance would go to trustees and put in trust for Stephen James Johns (younger son). Written 1778 – died 1793? Probate; letter of administration dated 1793 (16th December.)ie proved 1793 Stephen John (younger) married Ann James from Saltash daughter of merchant. Richard Johns esq. of Trewince or his heirs or assigns are entitled to a moity of all the tithable lands of the parish, except Rosteague, Trewarthas, Tregair, Tregairwoon.

Location, location, location!

Posted on: 10th February 2012
Trewince Aerial View

Trewince Aerial View

Long ago, all the fields around Trewince had descriptive names, and these can still been seen in the Tithe map of 1841 which can be viewed in the County Records office. The names are even older than this, though. In the Henderson Calendars we read:

“25/5/1648 Sir Peter Courteney leases to Ferdinando Hobbs of Gerrans gent for £60 and a surrender all Trewince and 4 closes called the Well Ground 20 acres, the Pease Meadow 1 1/4 acres, the Westerne grounds 12 lying on the west side of the Highway from Gerrans to St Anthony and being part of Trewynce and lands called the Downes 80 acres and a piece of waste ground called Polkerah (?) – lives said Ferdinando, Elizabeth his wife and Nicholas (son) — to the manor of Trethyn (illegible)”.

One field  below Trewince is called Pardon Bank, and it is where Henry VIII allegedly pardoned all political offenders in the area. In his “Accounts of the memories and reminiscences of a number of people of the parish of Gerrans”, Sam Marsden, rector of Gerrans 1975 or 6, wrote:

” The field on the left hand side of the road down to Trewince was where Henry viii held court, at which he pardoned all political offenders in the area. It is known as the Pardon Bank.”

Laurence O’Toole in his book  “Roseland between river and sea” wrote that Henry VIII was credited with staying at the Royal Standard in Gerrans during the time he was building St Mawes Castle but there is actually no evidence that he ever came to Cornwall. A bit like those other legends about Joseph of Arimathea…..

Royal Cornwall Gazette, 29th October 1929

Posted on: 8th February 2012
apple
Extract from the Royal Cornwall Gazette, 29th October 1929 “Growers’ Outstanding Success at Birmingham”     Cornish growers have once again been successful at the Imperial Fruit Show at Birmingham. For top fruit growing Cornwall is one of the best, if not the most, severely handicapped of the counties in Great Britain, although fully compensated by the favourable climate for producing top fruit and… other out-of-season crops.     The Cornish growers were in competition with growers from all parts of England and Wales, including such fruit areas as Kent and Norfolk. In the light of this fact, the success of Maj. E. N. Willyams, Carnanton, St. Columb, and Maj. A. L. Thomas, Trewince, Portscatho, in taking the second and third prizes respectively in the class for box dessert apples is most creditable…..     The whole of the Cornish exhibits were packed as a result of instruction given by the Cornwall Education Committee Horticulture Department.

Who did Trewince belong to?

Posted on: 30th January 2012

It is interesting to try and trace the ownership of Trewince from the earliest days.

caption for Hobbs memorial Gerrans church

According to the Rentals and Surveys of Manors from manuscripts in the custody of the Ecclesiastical Commissioners, from the 1538 Survey the Manor of Tregear (which included St Mawes/  Portscatho/ Gerrans/ Lamoran/ Ruan/ Feock out to the Veryan boundary) had probably been church property for at least 1000 years. There was no specific mention of Trewince however. Tregear belonged to Bishop of Exeter at the time of Domesday 1085  but was probably administered by the ecclesiastical conmmissioners. It may have been held by religious bodies in Celtic times and gradually absorbed by the Diocesan Bishoprics of Bodmin and St Germans which were finally consolidated into one see with Devonshire c.1030.

1140: The parish of St Anthony was granted by the Bishop to the Priory of Plympton.

1538: A synopsis of the members of the Manor of Tregear from the rental of 1538 mentions Lands held by the Manor by Knights Service – including Trewyns.

In the times of the Star Chamber (Edward VI, 1537-53) we read that “Stephen Craier seized the manors of ….and a tenement called Trewince in Gerrans.

1563: Alice Reskymer made a will and left “to the heirs of her body …. a mes called Trewins in Cherens [Gerrans]. Alice R when she died she was seized of the manors of Trewins”.  Peter Courtenay esq. is also mentioned.

1613: Edward Courtneye of Trewyne (Trewynce) leased his ‘mes. and rent’ to the Eland family.

1617  Edward Courtneye of Trethwiffe in Lazack Esq and Elizabeth his wife leases to Nicholas Hobbs of Gerrans all those lands called Trewynce on the w side and the highway leading to Gerrans church towne called the Downes (80 acres) Lives Thamseyn wife of Nicholas Hobbs, Ferdinando and Jane son & daughter of the said Nicholas ans Tam. A lease was granted to Nicholas Hobbs of Gerrans : all those lands called Trewynce and certain closes part of Trewynce on the west side and the highway leading to Gerrans church towne.

1641 The Protestant returns list Ferdinando Hobbs and Edw Hobbs. (Everyone in England had to sign the Protestation swearing allegiance to the true Reformed Protestant religion against all Popery. In Cornwall the returns comprised a list of all male parishioners 18 and over).

Hobbs Memorial Gerrans Church

Hobbs Memorial Gerrans Church

Up to 1675 we continue to find references to the Hobbs family in relation to Trewince., and there is a Hobbs monument in the church at Gerrans which displays the family arms, namely “Argent, 3 escutcheons sable, each charged with an eagle displayed” or, “impaling, Argent, 2 swords in saltire proper, hilts and pommels or, in chief, a bunch of grapes of the second, leaved and stalked as the sale; being the arms of the family of Thomas of Tregolls near Truro.”

Hobbs Coat of Arms

Hobbs Coat of Arms